Krasny Hourglass necktie knot
Krasny Hourglass necktie knot
Krasny Hourglass necktie knot

It is official, I invented my own knot. I call this the Krasny Hourglass, because it looks like an hourglass and my name is Krasny. The knot is actually a Four in Hand knot with an additional knot tied using the little end below the primary knot. The result is two knots facing each other, or a long hourglass shaped knot. There might be an issue running out of fabric on the little end to fit into the loop if you are a taller person. A tie clip, suite or vest can be used to secure the tie. Looks awesome with any tie design including stripes. Tell me what you think!

Knot Dossier

  • Difficulty: High

    It is impossible to adjust after being tied so you need to do it right from the start. The initial Four-in-Hand is easy, but the second knot is tricky. You might need to get a little weird to manage the leftover fabric. Tucking it into your shirt works, as does wearing a vest.

  • Fabric Consumption: High

    This knot will consume nearly 100% of the fabric you have. It is two full knots. This is one of the reasons it is tied from a Four-in-Hand instead of any other knot, to save fabric.

  • Symmetry: Med

    The knot does have a slightly oblique look due to the Four-in-Hand nature of the knot. The knot also has some vertical symmetry which makes it very interesting.

  • Style: Any

    The knot itself can hold it’s own even with solid ties, works great with patterns, and even creates a cool effect with stripes. Don’t hold back.

  • Venue: Any

    Yes I do believe this knot will work in a formal setting. It still has the classic “knot” look while adding a little extra flair to the occasion. Of course it is totally excellent in less formal settings.

    • Ultra rare knot
    • Offers cool possibilities with stripes
    • Interesting effects with contrast ties
    • Might need a tie clip
12 replies
  1. David Foreman
    David Foreman says:

    Found this knot works well and is easier if you start with the seam side outwards and pass the fat end under the thin end before crossing over, so creating an inverted tail. Then, you don’t have to worry about folding the tail later.

    Reply
  2. Sid Simpson
    Sid Simpson says:

    1st attempt successful. Great design for symmetry. I don’t quite see how anyone would have an “extra fabric” problem, nor a problem adjusting the neck size. Once the first knot is properly adjusted, the remaining tail of the small in should hide well enough on its own without extra manipulation. As a matter of fact, mine is laying neatly with the seam to the back as in a basic Onasis knot.

    Reply
  3. TheAxeMan
    TheAxeMan says:

    can you post picture by picture instructions like the one for the trinity and eldredge knots for the krasny hourglass

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] that, like Mr. Simons, put a new spin on a previous form. The Krasny Hourglass knot, invented by Agree or Die – Krasny Knot’s founder Alex Krasny, starts with a basic Windsor knot, but it then takes a bit of a detour. […]

  2. […] that, like Mr. Simons, put a new spin on a previous form. The Krasny Hourglass knot, invented by Agree or Die – Krasny Knot’s founder Alex Krasny, starts with a basic Windsor knot, but it then takes a bit of a detour. […]

  3. […] will end June 1st, and the rules will be the same, except this time you need to show me your best Krasny Hourglass knot. To […]

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